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Weather

July 2018

Fourth Warmest Month on Record

By Russell Russ

July was a wet and very warm month. Compared to more urban locations, Norfolk typically sees cooler summer temperatures. Norfolk’s forested landscape and higher elevation plays heavily into this cooling influence. Sometimes though, the heat and humidity during the dog days of summer can overtake Norfolk’s somewhat protected little weather world. That was certainly the case in July when we saw hazy, hot and humid conditions for much of the month. The tropical air also resulted in above average rainfall.

July’s high temperature of 92 degrees was observed on July 1 and 2 and the low temperature of 48 degrees was observed on July 7. There were three days this month with record daily high temperatures: 92 on July 1 (was 90 in 1934 and 1964), 92 on July 2 (was 91 in 1934) and 89 on July 16 (tied record from 1969). In addition to these, heat records were nearly broken on July 3, 4, 5 and 17. July’s monthly mean temperature of 71.5 degrees was 3.4 degrees above normal.

This July was tied with 2010 as being not only the fourth warmest July on record, but also tied as the fourth warmest month of any month on record (since 1932). Quite impressive to think that there have been weather observations made for 1,039 months at this weather station and July 2018 was tied as the fourth warmest of all of those months. Norfolk’s warmest July on record was in 2013 with 72.7 degrees, the coolest was in 1962 with 63.9 degrees.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 6.36 inches, 2.02 inches above average. There were five thunderstorms this month, but nothing overly severe around here. With less than an inch of rainfall recorded through July 16, things were beginning to look dry. That changed dramatically during the second half of the month. While this July was wetter than normal it still was not even in the Top-10 for wettest. The wettest July was in 2014 with 12.76 inches, the driest was in 1939 with 1.29 inches.

We are doing quite well for precipitation this year. Through July the total precipitation amount for the year was 34.61 inches. This is 4.76 inches above average and also 7.39 inches more than the total through July 2017. For 2015-2017, Norfolk was below normal for precipitation through the month of July (also for those entire years). Even though we are doing just fine for moisture so far this year, some trees still are showing signs of stress from our previous years of drought. It can take two to three years for signs of drought to show up in trees. Our precipitation surplus this year will certainly be beneficial for our friends the trees.

An early look into August, through August 17, showed that August’s weather was looking much like our July weather. The heat, humidity and rainfall continued. Temperatures were running 6 degrees above normal and we had already seen 4.75 inches of rainfall, 0.12 inch above the normal for the entire month of August. Autumn is just around the corner. Enjoy the summer heat while it is here. It will not be long before we see cooler temperatures and even some changing leaf colors around here.

June 2018

Nice Summer Weather

By Russell Russ

June’s low temperature of 43 degrees was observed on June 4 and the high of 88 degrees was observed on June 18. With an average monthly mean temperature of 63.6 degrees, it was just 0.3 degree above normal. There were just a few really warm days in June and no daily temperature records were set. It was a pleasant weather month, very average for the month of June in Norfolk. Temperatures and humidity increased late in June and continued into early July.

This June was just about average for temperatures. Morning lows in the 40’s in June may seem a little chilly, but that is normal for Norfolk. Norfolk’s coolest June was in 1958 with an average monthly mean temperature of 58.8 degrees. The warmest June was in 1943 with 68.3 degrees.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 5.76 inches, 0.90 inch above normal. There were just two thunderstorms this month, neither of which were on the severe side. The monthly rainfall total was certainly helped by two days (June 4 and 28) with moderate to heavy rainfall during the overnight hours.

During the summer months, short duration downpours typically make up a large part of the monthly rainfall total, and also, the lack of them can mean a dry month. The driest June was in 1988 when only 0.74 inch was recorded. Our wettest June was in 2013 with 13.38 inches.

For the first half of 2018 our total precipitation amount was 28.25 inches. Through June, this puts Norfolk 2.74 inches above normal for the year. This is also nearly 5 inches above where we were last year at this point in time. The years of 2015 and 2016 were very dry. Fortunately, it seems we have turned the tide and can worry about other things besides a looming drought. Of course, July and August could be dry, they sometimes are, but compared to recent years, this year we have a little cushion to work with.

An early look at July through mid-month shows that it certainly did warm up. Temperatures were running about 5 degrees above normal and for three days in a row (July 1-3) Norfolk recorded high temperatures in the low 90’s. It was hazy, hot and humid for sure for the first five days of July. When the dew point is in the upper 60’s it is noticeably humid. A few days with dew points in the mid to upper 70’s in early July made it very uncomfortable.

If you were looking for some hot summer weather then you got it in early July. Record highs were recorded on July 1 (92) and July 2 (92). We just missed record highs on July 3, 4 and 5. July is typically Norfolk’s warmest month of the year. We are supposed to see some hazy, hot and humid conditions in July and we have had some of that. The weather station typically gets to 90 degrees or above two to three times a year. For 2018, Norfolk can say been there done that.

May 2018

From Prolonged Winter to Second Warmest May on Record

By Russell Russ

Once again, May was Norfolk’s transition month into summer, although this year it seemingly happened in just the span of a day or two. Temperatures went from a low of 34 degrees on May 1 (with snowfall on April 30) to a high of 85 on May 2, then to a record high of 88 on May 3. After a cool and snowy April, all of a sudden it was summertime. Then, temperatures went back to normal or a little above normal for the remainder of the month with another temperature rise during the month’s last week. The weather on Memorial Day was beautiful. It is always nice to have good weather for the parades and holiday festivities.

May’s low temperature of 34 degrees was observed on May 1 and the high of 88 degrees was observed on May 3. With an average monthly mean temperature of 59.8 degrees, it was 4.9 degrees above normal. May’s monthly mean temperature was nearly 21 degrees warmer than April’s. This May was Norfolk’s second warmest in the last 87 years. The 88 degrees on May 3 (was 83 in 1942) and the 84 on May 15 (was 83 in 1932) both set daily record high temperature marks. Norfolk’s warmest May occurred in 2015 with a temperature of 61.8 degrees, the coldest was in 1967 with 46.8.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 3.32 inches, 1.03 inches below normal. Through May, the total precipitation for the year was 22.49 inches. The last three months were below normal for precipitation, but thanks to above normal amounts in January and February we are currently 1.84 inches above normal for the 2018 calendar year.

There was no snowfall in May. Norfolk’s 2018 snowfall total through May was 91.1 inches. This was 25.8 inches above normal through May and is 1.3 inches above normal for the entire calendar year. We still have October, November and December to add to our 2018 snowfall total. The Winter Snowfall Season concluded in May and the final total for the 2017-2018 season was 107.5 inches, 17.7 inches above normal. It was not record breaking, but it was a snowy winter.

The big weather story from May was the severe weather that rolled through the Northeast during the afternoon of May 15. The strong thunderstorms that hit Norfolk produced vivid lightning, a burst of near-golf ball sized hail and nearly two inches of rain – all in little over an hour. There was some local hail damage reported, but thankfully there was minimal local wind damage. Not the case for many other parts of the state. The final official assessment was that Connecticut was hit that afternoon with straight-line wind damage, four tornados and multiple locations received severe hail damage. Additional severe reports came from eastern Pennsylvania and eastern New York. Norfolk was fortunate that day. It has been nearly 30 years since Connecticut has seen such widespread severe summer thunderstorm damage.

An early look at June’s weather through mid-month shows that temperatures were running about 2 degrees cooler than normal. There were several mornings with low temperatures in the low to mid 40’s. A little chilly for June, but a nice stretch of summerlike weather in the forecast for the latter half of the month will surely bring the monthly average temperature up. After a rainy first week it turned dry, but all in all, precipitation was about average through mid-month. It did seem to be a very good pollen year, or bad for the allergy sufferers. Perhaps the dry conditions just as the trees were ready to release their pollen this year compounded the effects. The clouds of yellow and haze in the air, mostly from pine pollen, were very noticeable June 9-12. With the pollen thankfully gone it must mean that summer has arrived.

April 2018

Prolonged Winter

By Russell Russ

April began cool and snowy and it stayed that way throughout most of the month. Warm and beautiful early spring days were few and very far between this April. It was more like winter was the unwanted guest that just would not leave the party. Late March showed signs of a possible arrival of spring, but early April snowfall dashed those hopes. Persistent and regular snow or sleet was the norm until the third week of the month. Cooler than normal temperatures lasted all through the month. March’s well above average snowfall left us all longing for spring, but as April progressed, the focus was not as much on spring, but that we just wanted winter to end.

April’s low temperature of 18 degrees was observed on April 6 and the high of 68 degrees was observed on both April 14 and 28. With an average monthly mean temperature of 39.0 degrees, it was 4.1 degrees colder than normal. There were no daily record temperatures this month, but overall this April was tied with 1965 as the sixth coldest April over the last 87 years. This was the case in much of the country this April. It was cool all over, especially in the Northeast.

Last year was Norfolk’s fourth warmest April; it was nearly 10 degrees warmer than this April. Norfolk’s warmest April was in 2010 with an average mean temperature of 49.4 degrees and the coldest was in 1943 with 36.8 degrees. Prior to this year, Norfolk’s April average monthly temperature has not been below 40 degrees since 1978.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 4.18 inches, just 0.05 inch below normal. Through April, our total precipitation for the year was 19.17 inches, 2.87 inches above normal. No deficit so far this year.

April’s snowfall total was 10.9 inches, exactly 5 inches above normal. Above normal, but not even in Norfolk’s Top 15 snowiest Aprils. The month began with 7 inches of snow on the ground. Finally, by April 21 the snow was all gone at the weather station, sixteen days later than last year. It did not accumulate, but it snowed for a few hours during the morning of April 30. A fitting end to a cold and snowy April.

The 2018 calendar year snowfall amount of 91.1 inches is already 1.3 inches above normal – for the entire calendar year. The 2017-18 winter season (October-April) snowfall total of 107.5 inches is 18.1 inches above normal. Interestingly, just two years ago during the 2015-16 winter season, Norfolk recorded a record-setting low snowfall total of just 35.5 inches – for the entire winter season.

An early look at May’s weather through May 20 shows that temperatures were running nearly 3 degrees warmer than normal. Hard to believe since the first three weeks of the month seemed so cool and wet. Two record-setting and one near record-setting warm days certainly affected this preliminary monthly average. It snowed on Monday, April 30 and on Wednesday, May 2 it was 85 degrees. On Thursday, May 3 it was 88 degrees. Welcome to New England weather.

By far, the biggest weather story of May will be the severe storms that hit many parts of the Northeast on May 15. During the thunderstorms that rolled through the state that afternoon, Norfolk received nearly 2 inches of rain (in little over an hour) and hail that was nearly golf ball-sized. Besides heavy rain and some minor wind and hail damage, Norfolk was spared the brunt of these storms. Several tornados were reported in Connecticut and eastern New York, resulting in widespread and extensive property and tree damage. Let’s hope the latter part of the month is more tranquil. A little drier and some more sunshine would be nice too.

March 2018

Fourth Snowiest March on Record

By Russell Russ

March was a month full of nor’easters. The brief warm up in February fooled everyone into thinking winter was over and spring was here. March relentlessly brought us all back into reality. The first day of March was warm, the warmest day of the month actually, but it was back to winter after that. From March 2 to March 22 the weather talk was all about current and pending nor’easter storms hitting New England. Thanks to February’s late month warmth, most local lakes and ponds were ice free as of March 1 and basically stayed that way to close the winter season despite March’s cool and snowy weather.

March’s high temperature of 53 degrees was observed on March 1 and the low of 8 degrees was observed on March 18 and 20. With an average mean temperature of 30.2 degrees, it was just 0.5 degree below normal. Temperature-wise it was a very normal March and there were no daily or monthly records set.

The total precipitation for the month was 4.02 inches, 0.41 inch below normal. Through the first quarter of 2018 the total precipitation amount was 14.99 inches, 2.92 inches above normal. Precipitation this month was mostly in the form of snow. In weather observing all snowfall is melted then measured as a liquid and is included in the total precipitation amount.

Snow was the story this month. The March 2-3 storm started as rain and then finished with 5 inches of snowfall. The March 7-8 storm was the big one, it gave us a total snowfall of 22.2 inches. The March 13-15 storm produced a total snowfall of 15.3 inches. On March 15 there was 26 inches of snow on the ground. The last storm was to hit March 21-22, but it stayed to our south giving Long Island large amounts of snow. Norfolk got just 0.8 inch from that one. That final nor’easter proved to be very difficult to forecast and many local meteorologists missed the call on it and took much heat from the public for their forecast failure. Observing and recording the weather is much easier than forecasting it.

March’s snowfall total of 43.5 inches was 26 inches above normal and ranks it as Norfolk’s fourth snowiest March over the last 87 years. We had a decent chance to come in second, but the failed March 21-22 storm stopped that. The snowiest March was in 1956 when Norfolk recorded a whopping 73.6 inches. The other top snowy Marches were 1967 with 46.5 and 1958 with 45.6 inches. Through the first quarter of 2018 the total snowfall amount was 80.2 inches, 21.2 inches above normal.

The 2017-18 winter season (October-March) snowfall total was 96.6 inches. This was 13.1 inches above normal and we still have April and May to officially close out the winter season.

Will April bring springtime to Norfolk? Not a chance, at least for the first three weeks of the month. Through April 22, temperatures were running nearly 8 degrees colder than normal and the monthly snowfall total of 10.9 inches was 5 inches above normal. Our winter season snowfall total rose to 107.5 inches, 18.1 inches above normal. Getting snow in April is not unusual, what was unusual; what was unusual was the regularity of snow or sleet. Of the first 19 days of the month, there were 12 days with either snow or sleet falling. It was endless winter and everyone was longing for springtime.

The good news is that the tide mostly turned by April 21 and warmer weather and no snow was in the immediate forecast. Let’s hope this forecast is accurate. Even though it was late in arriving this year, spring will be much welcomed by everyone. It has been a long winter.

February 2018

Third Warmest February on Record

By Russell Russ

Much like last year, this February started off very winter-like. All ponds were iced over, temperatures were seasonably cold, there was snow on the ground and snow was falling. Through two-thirds of the month, winter, which took hold in late December and continued all through January, had a firm grip on the weather. Then came the big warm up. The last week of the month was more like late spring than the deepest part of winter. Just like last year, by the end of the month we had seen record temperatures, the snow was all gone and the ponds were free of ice. Even the sap was flowing like it was late spring. It was a great month for maple syrup production. Spring had arrived. For the moment anyway.

The month’s low temperature of 1 degree was observed on February 3. The high temperature of 70 was observed on February 21. The average monthly mean temperature was 29.9 degrees, 8 degrees above normal. It was the third warmest February over the last 87 years. The warmest Februarys on record were in 2002 with 30.7 and 2017 with 30.2 degrees. There were three daily record high temperatures this month; Feb 12 with 52 degrees (was 45 in 1932), Feb 20 with 62 (was 57 in 1939) and Feb 21 with 70 (was 58 in 1953). The two coldest Februarys, also the two coldest of any month, were February 1934 with 9.0 degrees and February 2015 with 10.9 degrees. The average mean temperature for February is 21.9 degrees.

The total precipitation recorded for the month was 5.42 inches, 1.79 inches above normal. The 2018 calendar year, January and February, total precipitation amount of 10.97 inches is 3.33 inches above normal. Drought is currently not a concern.

The monthly snowfall total of 16.5 inches was 4.1 inches below normal. A majority of the snowfall came during the first half of the month. The 2018 calendar year snowfall total through February is 36.7 inches. This is 4.8 inches below normal, but 7.4 inches more than last year at this time. The snowfall total for this winter season, October through February, is 53.1 inches. This is 12.9 inches below normal and 13 inches less than last winter at this time.

A look ahead to March shows that spring in fact was not just around the corner and that any snowfall deficit would soon be completely changed to a large snowfall surplus. The first day of March was warm and there was no snow on the ground. Then, after three nor’easters and potentially a fourth by the third week of the month, things were very, very wintery once again.

Temperatures were running about 2 degrees colder than normal and it would be an understatement to say that Norfolk saw some snowfall in March. As of March 15, just after the third storm, March’s snowfall total was 42.7 inches. This is 25.2 inches above the monthly normal and by mid-month this March was already the fifth snowiest over the last 87 years. By mid-month Norfolk was just 4 inches away from recording its second snowiest March over the last 87 years. Sorry, there are no records at this weather station from the Blizzard of 1888. The snowiest March on record was in 1956 when 73.6 inches were recorded. Pretty good chance we will not reach that amount this year, but coming in as second snowiest seems very likely.

January 2018

Fairly Typical January (Winter) Weather

By Russell Russ

During all of 2017 Norfolk only reached zero or below zero five times. January 2018 has already matched that. In January 2017 Norfolk had only three days with low temperatures in the single digits or lower. This January had ten days in the single digits or lower. December was also colder than normal. Of those five days in 2017 with temperatures of zero or below, four of them occurred in December. Winter is back, at least in December and January it was.

January’s average mean temperature of 19.8 degrees was just 1.0 degree below normal. Norfolk’s warmest January on record was in 2002 with an average temperature of 31.7 degrees and the coldest was in 1982 with 11.7 degrees. The month’s high temperature of 58 degrees was observed on January 12. This was a record high for that date, beating the old high of 52 set in 1932 and 2017. The low temperature of minus 10 degrees was observed on January 7. There were two low temperature records this month, January 1 with minus 8 tied the previous 1964 record and the minus 10 on January 12 surpassed the previous record of minus 7 set in 1942.

January’s total precipitation of 5.55 inches was 1.54 inches above normal. Not that impressive, but it was Norfolk’s 16th wettest January in the last 87 years. The wettest January was in 1979 with 11.77 inches. The monthly snowfall total of 20.2 inches was just 0.7 inch below normal. The snowiest January was in 1987 with 50.5 inches. The 2017-2018 winter season, October through January, snowfall amount of 36.6 inches is 8.8 inches below normal.

The biggest weather story from January was probably the flooding that occurred after the rapid warm-up and heavy rainfall on January 11-13. Going from record lows to record highs in a matter of days, plus getting 2.62 inches of rain on top of our 10 inches of snow on the ground certainly added to flooding concerns. For people along the Housatonic and Connecticut Rivers it was ice jam issues, fairly uncommon for us here in Southern New England.

A look at February’s weather through mid-month shows that the wild swings in temperature and some fairly impressive rainfall totals continue to be a factor. Temperatures were running nearly 4 degrees above normal with precipitation already about a half inch above the normal monthly amount. With record warmth on February 12 and more in the forecast for February 20-22 it seems our up and down winter will continue. On the plus side, the February warm-up has resulted in Great Mountain Forest’s second earliest maple sap collection in over 70 years.

January 2018

An early look at January’s weather

By Russell Russ

A quick look at the weather for the first half of January. During the first week of January there were three days with below zero temperatures and two days with zero degree temperatures. By the middle of the month there were additional days with lows of 1, 2 and 3 degrees. It was definitely a cold start to the new year. By comparison, the entire year of 2017 had only four days below zero and one day at zero – and all but one of those occurred during the last four days of the year.

A temperature of minus 8 degrees on January 1 tied a 1964 record low for that date. A low of minus 10 on January 7 surpassed the old 1942 record of minus 7. By January 10 Norfolk’s average temperature was nearly 14 degrees below the normal for January. Then, oddly enough on January 12, Norfolk set a daily high temperature record with 58 degrees, easily beating the old 1932 and 2017 record of 52. It was a brief warm-up though, between January 13 and 14 the temperature went from the upper 50’s to a cold 1 degree.

Through mid-month there had been two snowstorms that brought the monthly snowfall total to 19.4 inches, almost the average amount for the entire month. Then there was the January 12-13 rain storm that dumped 2.62 inches of rain. Just prior to the big warm-up and heavy rains there was 10 inches of snow on the ground with a water equivalent of 2.4 inches. The heavy rains combined with the rapid snowmelt (it all melted) resulted in flooding conditions in many locations in the state. By mid-month the total precipitation amount was 4.09 inches, already a little above the normal for the entire month of January.

It was a wild weather beginning for 2018. If the rest of the year follows suit then it should prove to be much more exciting than 2017.

Stay tuned for a complete monthly weather summary for January. See “Past Narratives” for past weather summaries, including November and December 2017 and a Year Review for 2017. Also check out the “Weather Data Sheets” for other weather summary data as soon as it becomes available.