The Mountain Log

A week-by-week look at what is happening in nature.

A special thanks to Virginia Barlow’s Ginny’s Calendar in Northern Woodlands Magazine.

Photo by LizMarie_AK

Week 50

Sweet everlasting lasts well into winter, as does its fragrance, a bit like new mown hay / Hibernating woodchucks warm up every few days to urinate, raising their temperatures from about 40°F to over 94°F / New seed catalogs arrive in the mail. Time to plan next year’s garden / Snow usually does not deter moose: their long, skinny legs can plow through 30 inches of it without a problem.


by Rick Leche

Week 49

Red-breasted nuthatches are territorial in winter; a pair will defend about 10 acres / Look for evergreen wood fern and Christmas fern in the woods and for rock polypody on rocky outcrops before the snow gets deep. These ferns stay green all winter / Noisy flocks of pine grosbeaks (chee-chip or chee-chip-chip) will leave the hulls of white ash seeds on the ground after feeding on the seeds / Roadkill may account for an increase in the winter crow population.


Photo by Rick Leche

Week 48

Red-breasted nuthatches are territorial in winter; a pair will defend about 10 acres / Look for evergreen wood fern and Christmas fern in the woods and for rock polypody on rocky outcrops before the snow gets deep. These ferns stay green all winter / Noisy flocks of pine grosbeaks (chee-chip or chee-chip-chip) will leave the hulls of white ash seeds on the ground after feeding on the seeds / Roadkill may account for an increase in the winter crow population.


Photo by dmott9

Week 47

Mice will move indoors after a heavy snow. Considering their size, they make a lot of noise / Until snow covers them, blueberry bushes will be browsed by deer / The glossy, toothed leaves of pipsissewa, or prince’s pine, stay green all winter. Its botanical name, Chimaphila, is from the Greek and means “to love winter”.


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